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turkey and pakistan. so that constitutes the click of the taliban leadership in formally. second is the military side. people who may not be on the ground in afghanistan leading fighters but directing the insurgency on the day-to-day level. they either distressed u.s. intentions lower point* through the 2002 through 2004 period and many are people that did try to cut the deals and were rebuffed so know are on the military side. said talking to them as well there is a sense that they can reconstitute the '90s taliban. so if they hold on a little bit longer they can do that. but it is to understand the different position those with ordinary afghans with a focus on the troop number and talking whether there is 6,000 or 3,000 troops in afghanistan. that is important in the village where it is thought they would say they don't want any troops but in my discussion they don't think about it which is what we face today is a question of state formation. and in 2004. what i mean by that is and attempting to build the afghan state what happened was on the one hand they put money into kabul
to the important issues regarding pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tr
steve as well about your deep knowledge of afghanistan and pakistan and the other bordering states. >> this is one that has taken a back burner. we are not that far removed from the election. the election was about by and large nothing more than the economy and which side could do it better. as a result almost every other issue gets pushed to the side, but we have, you know -- there are realtime tables in place in afghanistan about what we have pledged to do, what we will do. you talk about chuck hagel. what chuck hagel's role in all of that, if et wants to be secretary of defense. it's a complicated issue, and it's more complicated politically, andrea, simply because the american public -- this happened in iraq. it's clearly happening in afghanistan. the american public has tired of our involvement in these conflicts. this is not something new. this is something that has been long and coming. if you look at the history in polling at least of when that happens, public opinion almost never sort of sways back up to all of a sudden be supportive and think this was a battle worth fight
. and with respect to pakistan's and safe havens there, afghanistan and the united states and pakistan all have an interest in reducing the threat of extremism in some of these border regions between afghanistan and pakistan. and that's going to require more than simply military actions. that's really going to require political and diplomatic work between afghanistan and pakistan and the united states, obviously, will have an interest in facilitating and participating in cooperation between the two sovereign countries. but as president karzai i think has indicated, it's very hard to imagine a stability and peace in the region if pakistan and afghanistan don't come to some basic agreement and understanding about the threat of extremism to both countries and both governments. and both capitals. and i think you are starting to see a greater awareness of that on the part of the pakistani government. [ speaking foreign language ] >> translator: the question that you have made about -- we talked about this issue of -- in detail today. about the prisoners, about the detention centers. all of these wil
, or instead, a different kind of mission? and pakistan in particular, the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of policy will you have? thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat, our main reason , should we have troops in afghanistan post-2014, at the invitation of the afghan government, will be to make sure that we are training, assisting, and advising afghan security forces who have taken the lead and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan and and interest the united states has, the reason we went into first place, is to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghanistan. we believe we can achieve that mission in a way that is very different from the very active presence that we have had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai has emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presence is in afghan villages, for example, has created. that will not be a strain if there is a follow-up operation because that will not be our responsibility. that will be th
from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in at that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interest not only of the afghan people and the united states, but the entire region. and finally, we reaffirm the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, the partnership between two sovereign nations, deepening ties of trade and commerce, development of education, opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region, as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow strong. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments and development that delivers for the afghan people an
drastically increased the use of predator drones. 329 targeted strikes have taken place in pakistan since 2004, but the vast majority have taken place since 2009. although opposition to the president's use of drones has remained largely silent, that seems to be changing. two days ago in hawaii protesters paraded signs close to where the first family was vacationing, which read drones kill kids and is it really okay if obama does it? last week a federal judge ruled the administration did not need to disclose internal communications about the drone program. the "new york times" and the aclu had filed requests in 2011 for the legal justification of these targeted killings, including the drone strike that killed anwar al alaki, an american citizen living in yemen. the white house denied that request for purposes of national security. the judge approved the administration's right to keep that information classified, but still questioned the drone program, writing, "i can find no way around the thicket of laws and precedents that effectively allow the executive brarchg of our government to proclaim
with facilitation for talks. reconciliation requires constructive support from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken, and look for more tangible steps, because a stable at future afghanistan is in the interest of not only the afghans and the united states but of the entire region. we reaffirmed the strategic partnership that we signed last year in kabul, an enduring partnership between sovereign nations. this includes deepening ties in trade talks, commerce, , education, and opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans into the region as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. let me close by saying this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and the tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces will still be growing stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments at the ballot that delivers for the af
, a different kind of mission? those who are in the pakistan, particularly the safe havens that are in pakistan, what kind of police will you have? thank you. >> the mission will be fundamentally different. just to repeat, our main reason should we have troops in afghanistan post 2014 at the invitation of the afghan government, will be to make sure that we are training, assisting and advising afghan security forces, who have now taken the lead for and are responsible for security throughout afghanistan, and an interest that the united states has, the very reason we went to afghanistan in the first place, and that is to make sure that al qaeda and its affiliates cannot launch an attack against the united states or other countries from afghan soil. we believe that we can achieve that mission in a way that is very different from the very active presence that we have had in afghanistan over the last 11 years. president karzai emphasized the strains that u.s. troop presences in afghan villages, for example, have created. well, that's not going to be a strain that exists if there is a follow-up opera
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
libya and egypt and syria and pakistan. we are talking about a world that is changing and is less responsive to u.s. pressure and u.s. military power and diplomacy. that changes something that chuck hagel is aware of and he has well-formed views on. at the heart of that view is that power should be diffused away from the american military and plates and other power centers around the world and that idea itself is controversial. president obama agrees with that and many in congress do not. host: the former senator gave an interview with his former state paper, "the lincoln journal star" he said his critics have distorted his views. guest: it is unusual for a to give any interviews at all but he has faced a much criticism that he wanted to get one opening salvo out there and that is what he did. he basically said that he will have a chance to correct the record during his confirmation hearing. we should note from that interview that he is not backing down from any of his positions. he is not saying he no longer believes in the things that he believed in that were so controversial. h
national security goal. we'd like to be able to also keep an eye on pakistan's western provincess from that area as well and continue some of the operations that as you know we've been conducting from afghanistan to go after terrorists there too. those are our core interests. everything else is in the category of nice to v. unfortunately you can't necessarily go after a terrorist unless you help the afghan government stay on its feet and that means you've got to help them politically, economically, with their own army, and if you're trying to rush out by 2014, by the end of next year, and pull out everybody except, you know, a few seals and delta force commandos the afghans may not have the help they need to hold their own country together and your ultimate goals may not be achievable. that is where there are a lot of issues that wind up getting brought here. one last one is the afghan presidential elections next year. hamid karzai is supposed to step down in about 15 months. i think he will. but there is a big question about who is going to replace him, how much he will try to influen
, including the areas most closer to pakistan. >> ambassador, i was struck by the last question that the president was asked at his joint press conference about afghan women. and in response, he said, in part, the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women and the u.s. strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. what is the reality right now for women and girls in afghanistan? and what is the reality likely to be for women and girls after the u.s. troop presence is withdrawn? >> in the major cities in kabul, obviously, it's been a huge renaissance of women's rights and across the country and the u.s. military empowered young women building schools and institutions to promote women's rights and microfinance. but when you get closer outside the countryside, away from the major cities, there have been attacks by the taliban on schools, against women, and so, this is where the fault line lies. the women who are furthest away from the major cities of the -- that are under the control of the central government most at risk o
shenski. >>> five militant are dead in the fifth drone attack of the new year in pakistan. intelligence sources say the drone fired four missiles at a house near the pakistan/afghanistan border. several people were also injured. about 40 militants have been killed in strikes in the north waziristan tribal region since the new year, including a senior al qaeda commander. >>> afghan president hamid karzai will continue his tour of d.c. today with meetings with top national security leaders. he met with defense secretary leon panetta at the pentagon. later tonight he will meet with secretary of state hillary clinton. yesterday karzai met with senators on capitol hill. they discussed how many troops will remain in his country after combat forces pull out in 2014. karzai scheduled to meet with president obama tomorrow. >>> this morning, the u.s. court of appeals will hear arguments regarding pictures of osama bin laden's corpse. a freedom of information act's lawsuit requests the release of more than 50 photos of bin laden after he was killed during a raid by navy s.e.a.l.s in may, 2011. the
of the civil war are beginning and happening with those type of troops. >> shepard: pakistan, china and iran will play major roles over there you said. his goal now is just to get as much money as he can? >> well, you know, i was talking to the general who runs an area in the north there and he said why are the americans letting the communists in. hamid karzai is signing deals to protect afghanistan. he wants us to protect them and let other people grab all the wealth that is still to be tapped. >> shepard: there has never been any real indication the afghan forces were able to do much of anything. fewer than 5% of people with read or write. >> i was told that the afghan forces trained by the russians were better are trained on the afghan forces they have now. they are very good but they don't have air support and we have to provide all of the major intel and observation and air lift and logistics that they need to fight the taliban. >> shepard: to what end? >> i really don't know. hamid karzai is doubling down on the taliban and that means the south will love it but the north will not be ve
extent pakistan is playing a role in these conversations. >> reporter: that's a good question. obviously pakistan will have to play a significant role. we're trying to get more information on that as we go forward. having been in pakistan just more than a year ago for the death of osama bin laden, the challenges that exist there are as great as any, especially given waziristan and the areas where the two countries border, but also those avenues for the u.s. to be able to receive all of the munitions that it needs and its supply lines so pakistan will clearly be critical in terms of the u.s. conversation going forward. >> steve rattner? >> so chuck, just back to guns for a second. any guesses yet on what the shape of an obama package would look like and when it would come? >> well, it seems -- first of all, they said it's going to be in the state of the union. that's number one. the second is that it would -- you know, there seems to be that they're going around -- they want to push something on the magazines. push more on this mental health check aspect. i think they're going to throw th
years by the taliban. we succeeded against that. there are executions and -- pakistan is going through a very difficult time. and other of events there, they are all a source of concern for us. i can speak with satisfaction, the suffering that we have had, our schools are safer in the past three years, the great majority of girls go to school in afghanistan do if in safety and security. we have not had any major incidents. and this concern for families and students would be less and less a matter to think of. thank you, sir. >> this will conclude the program. i have one important announcement before i thank our remarkable speaker. please do not leave your seat until you hear the voice in the wilderness that will this mess us. and only the afghan delegation will depart until such moment. on behalf of all of us, you have given us allot to think about. a lot of inspiration. women are lucky to have your support and we look forward to a wonderful future for your country. thank you so much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable
. it was the deadliest day in pakistan in years. >>> later today the president of afghanistan meets with president obama at the white house. kyla. >> reporter: pam, the white house says we shouldn't expect any firm numbers or timeline to come out of today's talks but it's still a critical meeting. president obama and president hamid karzai will discuss how fast the u.s. will withdraw troops from afghanistan. the war formerly ends next year. but the u.s. military has proposed keeping as many as 15,000 troops in afghanistan past 2014 and that is to continue pursuing terrorists and training afghan security forces. karzai spent yesterday meeting with president leaders and asked for military equipment like drones and helicopters to insure security in afghanistan. >> it's fair to say we immediate very good progress on all of the key issues we discussed. >> one of the other big things the pentagon wants to know if afghan leaders will keep the taliban out of their country after u.s. troops lead. what karzai had to say about that when i see you next. live in washington kyla campbell. >>> time 5:15. weeks after m
on the job. >>> new this morning from pakistan shiites in the city that was hit yesterday by several terror attacks that killed 120 people they are refusing to bury the dead. it's a protest to demand that the government do something to protect them from attacks by sunni extremists. >>> in less than an hour from right now a very critical meeting agains between president obama and hamid karzai. as kyla campbell reports the outcome could determine how many american troops come home this year. kyla. >> reporter: dave more than 60,000 u.s. troops are in afghanistan right now. president obama has not determined how many will leave the middle east this year. the u.s. war on terror in afghanistan officially ends next year. u.s. and nato forces are set to leave by the year of 2014. this year afghan forces are supposed to take the lead in security and that means thousands of u.s. traps could return home. but president obama is open to keeping anywhere from 3,000 to 15,000 u.s. troops in afghanistan. after the end of the war next year. the u.s. leaders want to make sure afghan officials can run their
region from pakistan, afghanistan and officials say iran made up the story to learn about the inner-workings of u.s. counterintelligence. the but the bottom line, bill, that the united states authorities have now told the ap wire service they believe iran is behind this abduction. now what can washington do to try and encourage iran? bill: big question. they have a daughter who is getting married in a month. we'll talk to the mother christine. that is the wife of robert, what she believes is the whereabouts of her husband. she still thinks he is in iran. the government needs to do more to bring him home. christine levinson, our guest live next hour here in "america's newsroom." we'll have that for you live. martha: tough for her. she is coming up at the top of the next hour. meantime we're learning some new details about possible white house plans for troop withdrawals from afghanistan ahead of next year's drawdown. there is a new report out that has an administration official floating the idea of pulling out all of the troops. the so-called zero option. molly henneberg is with us i
have pakistan next door. that is still where the majority of the terrorism that affects us is coming from. but i think people do understand particularly after osama bin laden was killed that we need to draw down significantly. that we need to scale back our presence in the region. because look at the end of the day we're not going to create a jeffersonian democracy in afghanistan. that's not something we even really want to do as a nation. we really want to focus more at home. >> i'm going to switch gears right now. and i'll start with joy here with regard to the talk about the president's cabinet picks this week. there's been so much discussion about that. some people have been criticizing the president for his lack of diversity. in fact, here's what congressman charlie rangel said about this on msnbc. here it is. >> it's embarrassing as hell. we've been through all this with mitt romney. we were very hard on mitt romney with his women binder. >> so overly harsh assessment by the congressman? what do you think? >> it's three people. i find it a little bit funny that we're going into
availability on thursday afternoon. >> what is happening at the india and pakistan border? this time it is kind of a serious matter took place and fightings are happening at the border. according to -- [indiscernible] with president karzai coming here and things going on in washington and what is happening in afghanistan. what if india -- it might be hurting inya. >> well, the issue of tensions between india and pakistan is something that the secretary knows very well. we all hope that we can maintain peace and stability in the region. the secretary has affirmed that on visits throughout that region including to india. on tissue of terrorism, let me say that we stand with everyone in the world to include those in india and pakistan who take a hard line against terrorists who want to kill civilians whether they are pakistani, indian or american civilians. we believe there needs to be a united front against terrorist groups operating in that part of the world and others. >> as transition to what is the last time that the secretary had been asked by yained of any kind of help -- are they going to
by pakistani authorities in pakistan. others were arrested in thailand by the police. you had nashiri who was arrested in to buy another arrested in somalia. the notion that we have to have the special forum that has battlefield conditions is a great smokescreen for this second-rate process that says more about us than about the people we are trying to bring before us. another important piece is the issue of torture. the senate select committee on intelligence completed their report recently and you probably saw john mccain and dianne feinstein said the report concludes torture did not work. they say it was a stain on our reputation. it is important that that report is declassified to the public in light of "zero dark 30." it is about the killing of osama bin laden bin laden. i think the movie will do for torture with jaws did for sharks. it will become the public perception of reality and it is a lie. i think that moving makes it doubly important for the senate select committee to report -- to get the report declassified so the public can have a debate on the truth and not this hollywood
that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afghanistan. what will he be saying? guest: president karzai correctly feels that he does not have control of what is going on inside his country. special operations, conducting raids inside afghanistan late at night without necessarily afghan permission, or not necessarily the afghans always doing is q
to afghanistan, pakistan is where al qaeda is today. the president, on over 300 occasions, has authorized strikes to kill al qaeda on one side of the mountain and we're trying to keep them from coming in on the other side back into afghanistan. and to leave that place open would hurt our own security so i don't want to stay there for the sake of the afghans but i want to leave enough of our special operations forces there so they can strike wherever they have to and we can't do that if we pull out entirely. >> celeste ward gventer, why doesn't that make sense? >> well, i think you have to consider whether, if we left 20,000 or nine thousand or 3,000 troops there, when does it end? when is this over? it seems like a recipe for just staying there, disrupting these groups in perpetuity, and it's not clear to me that advances what is ultimately a complete kel problem in afghanistan. it's no at military problem. also, our presence may be creating what is called a moral hazard. states in the region and political groups in afghanistan are precisely not reaching the accommodation they need to reach becau
's hoping he will have an effect across the border with the insurgency that he says stems from pakistan. >> general, have we met our goals there? >> do we know what our established goals are other than going after osama bin laden? >> the mission evolved over time, but first, under secretary rumsfeld we weren't going stay and then we got in a fight in 2002 and then we continued to drag this mission forward because we realized the taliban will be reconstituted. by 2005 they had reconstituted and they were posing an increasing threat. so i think this is one of the cases where the country belongs to afghanistan and afghans. it's not going to be the 51st state. we've trained the forces and we've done as much as we could. can we continue to have some training and support? yes. we've got osama bin laden and it's time to transition this mission and move on. >> atia, you were one of the last reporters to interview hamid karzai. he blamed nato-aligned forces for the insurgency that has rocked the nation recently. that finger-pointing itself did that come up within the meetings in washington becau
countries, including iran and pakistan. so right now it would be interesting to see what exactly is being discussed. at the most as we both now, america wants to leave afghanistan for the most part but the afghans feel america needs to stay. >> after president karzai met with different members of the senate yesterday, he was asked a very interesting question. but the lack of answer is the most telling. take a look. >> what kind of force would you like to see left in your country? >> thank you, everybody. >> i was told by the organizer of the senate to keep quiet after this one. >> thank you, everybody. >> told by the organizer to keep quiet on that and get a pat on the arm there by mitch mcconnell. proposed keeping 15,000 troops in afghanistan. the president hasn't made it clear exactly where the numbers are going to be. do you expect there could be a full withdrawal and won't be any type of -- left behind as atia is reporting. >> i don't think so. i think the zero option is a diplomatic bluff if you like, setting up the negotiations that are taking place right now as we speak, i think th
to afghanistan, pakistan is where al qaeda is today. the president on over 300 occasions, has authorized strikes to kill al qaeda on one side of the mountain and we're trying to keep them from coming in on the other side back into afghanistan. and to leave that place open would hurt our own security so i don't want to stay there for the sake of the afghans but i want to leave enough of our special operations forces there so they can strike wherever they have to and we can't do that if we pull out entirely. >> celeste ward gventer, why doesn't that make sense? >> well, i think you have to consider whether if we left 20,000 or nine thousand or 3,000 troops there, when does it end? when is this over? it seems like a recipe for just staying there, disrupting these groups in perpetuity, and it's not clear to me that advances what is ultimately a complete kel problem in afghanistan. it's no at military problem. also our presence may be creating what is called a moral hazard. states in the region and political groups in afghanistan are precisely not reaching the accommodation they need to reach because
constructive support from across the region including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interests not only the afghan people and the united states but of the entire region. and finally we reaffirmed the strategic part they are shnersh last year. this includes deepening ties of trade, commerce, strengthening institutions, development, education, and opportunities for all afghans. men and women, boys and girls. and this sends a clear message to afghans and to the regions as afghans stand up, they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow stronger. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governance and development that delivers for the afghan people. and an end t
in pakistan after coordinated bomb attack that killed 96 people yesterday. religious leaders refusing to bury their dead until the government promises to protect them from further violence. >> jamie: there is a new push to hold syrian leaders responsible for the violence in the country's civil war going on there. 50 countries backing a proposal to the united nations to clear the way for referring members of the assad regime to the war crimes tribunal in the hague. >> gregg: a new concern as the flu outbreak spreads all over the country. there are reports of a shortage of the medication tamiflu. we'll have more on this in just a moment. >> jamie: also this is an interesting story. it's billed as a future of commercial air travel. federal regulators have already raised pretty serious concerns about boeing's 787 dreamliner. she's sweet burks there is problems. they're calling for a comprehensive review of the design, the manufacturing and the assembly process of the plane after a string of frightening incidents. dominic with the latest from our los angeles bureau. tell us what is the latest? >>
at a press conference that just ended. >>> bombings in pakistan have claimed at least 120 lives in the worst day of violence there in five years. the blast occurred in the southwestern city of quetta. most of the dead were shiite muslims killed in a billiard hall targeted by sunni extremist. the suicide attack was followed by a car bomb four minutes later. >>> ford plans to hire 2,000 sallied workers in the u.s. in manufacturing and information technology. it marks one of the largest planned increases for the company in more than a decade and will help build on the 8100 total u.s. jobs ford added last year. those are the headlines. get you back to tracy. tracy: arthel, thank you very much. have a great weekend. >> you too. tracy: dreamliner 787 is boeing's newest and most technologically advanced airplane but after a series of mishaps, federal regulators launched a big ol' review. we get to the bottom line with liz macdonald. >> a fuel leak. fire. two more incidents on nippon airways. what happened, that's right, the press conference this morning boeing saying they're going to do a joint pro
, that's been going on for over ten years. do you know where he is? >> i would assume pakistan. he always had the require for more operations than ubl did. we didn't see glimmers of ubl or even shadows but what we would see is that zawahiri was moving around and communicating. when i was involved and we felt we had a good location for him, that was never true for ubl. my sense is that by doing that he will make himself more vulnerable over time and he's very dangerous to the pakistanis, the west. many people would like to get him and i think basically they will. >> what i'm hearing about your criticism of the pakistanis is the u.s. cannot trust what's going on in pakistan right now. am i correct in my analysis. >> it's great that you used the word trust because just for context if you were to put on a pakistani lens and look back at the united states, back from their founding in 1947 with a very difficult history, they would argue that they haven't been able to trust the united states consistently. they helped dr. kissinger go to china. we had a treaty they thought we had had if they went
: they are refusing to bury the dead after a brutal terror attack in pakistan. southwestern part of the country. the town of quetta. the victims families demanding the government do something to protect them after twin bombings outside of a pool hall that killed 86 people, mostly shiite. that was one of several attacks across the country on thursday that left 120 dead. making it the nation's deadliest day of violence it has seen in five-year's time. martha: well the nra is now saying that the white house was just quote, checking a box, when they sat down yesterday with vice president joe biden to talk about gun violence which has been the real course of all these meetings over the course of this week. the group says they believe that the obama administration is less interested in protecting children and more interested in attacking the second amendment. so the nra says that the white house is set on blaming the actual weapon rather than getting tougher on the person using it. here's some of that. >> we feel very strongly that gun crime needs to be prosecuted vigorously and that is not happening
targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> there you go. >> makes perfect sense to me. with us now, let's bring in chief white house correspondent for
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